Virtual Tours

The Hessenpark Open Air Museum can now also be explored digitally – at least in parts. We have equipped five furnished buildings, which are among the public’s favorites in Hessenpark, with virtual tours.

These can be used to prepare for or follow up on a visit to the museum. They also offer barrier-free access to the buildings for all those who have problems overcoming the steps or thresholds. Every corner of the building and each piece of furniture can now be explored with a mouse click and magnification. Explanatory texts convey important information about the history of the houses and their inhabitants.

The tours were funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media on the basis of a resolution by the German Federal Parliament.

House from Breitenbach

This dwelling’s modern look is the result of several alterations. At the museum, the interior of the house was reconstructed based on conversations with witnesses for the years from 1955 to 1957. In those years, four households with eleven people lived together very closely on a living area of only about 50 square metres.

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House from Eisemroth

The dwelling was built in 1802 to replace an earlier building which was in a state of disrepair. The interior is laid out in the manner typical of central German timber-frame houses, with a hall at the centre and two identically-sized areas for various uses to its left and right, respectively. In the Open Air Museum, the house was restored to its circa 1928 state.

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House from Fellingshausen

This small farmer’s dwelling is a two-storey timber-framed house with a small adjoining garden. Two outbuildings belonged to this house. Until about 1800, Fellingshausen was characterised by small and medium-sized farmsteads. Over the course of the 19th century, the village developed into an industrial workers’ community with many workers farming on the side thanks to the opening up of regional hematite deposits for exploitation and the establishment of cigar factories. The grandparents of the last owner of the House of Fellingshausen updated the house in 1922 to meet their needs, and this is the state it has been restored to at the museum.

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House from Frankenbach

At its original location, the ground floor walls of this bizonal, two-storey dwelling were rendered and the timber framework was not visible. The windows on the same floor had been modernised. In the course of reconstruction at the museum, the door was renewed. The infills on the street-side gable were partly decorated with pargetting ornaments applied in stippling technique. At the museum, the dwelling was restored to a possible 1740/50 state, as a open-hearth house with a fireplace without a chimney.

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House from Sieblos

This byre dwelling from the highlands of the Rhön, situated across from the museum’s wood pasture, was originally part of the larger Grösch farm estate in Sieblos, which around 1900 was one of the largest farmsteads in the village. Here, in the museum, it is furnished in the way it would have looked in the 1920s. Since no original furnishings existed, items from the museum’s collection have been used.

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